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organizer of the 20th- century. he organized the march on washington. and he spoke to fdr and told him about the condition of black people in this country, working people in this country. and fdr said i don't disagree with anything you said, but you have to make me do it. this is a story that barack obama, who was a senator then running for president, responded and said make me do it. make me do it. and i think that is the challenge of this second term. who will have president obama's here? it is not about what is in his heart or what he believes. he is a community organizer. he did not -- he responds to demand. power concedes nothing without a demand. it never has and it never will. and that is, i think, the challenge of the many different groups that actually elected him. i think the first time around, in 2008, people were shocked. they were exhausted. and they also saw a real right- wing backlash against president obama that they did not want to contribute to. that was racist as well. you know, the birth or movement, you cannot be from here. who wants to back that? now it is four years la
.i.a. bombshell. victory and fallout, tonight on "washington week." the lines were long. the victory party was robust. >> a long campaign is now over. and whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. gwen: a the thank yous were fervert. >> i'm really proud of all of you. it will go on in history. people will read about it it. and they'll marvel about it. >> as president obama claimed his second term. the election turned out to be a lesson in truth and consequences. what did the obama campaign do right and what did the romney campaign do wrong? >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about americans. this election is over. but our principles endure. >> the voters have their say. leaving washington to search for a compromise even as a fiscal crisis looms. >> this is an opportunity for the president to lead. this is his. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. gwen: here to cover another historic week dan balz of "the washington post." john dickerson of
nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> wherever it goes, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. that's why we're here. >> corporate funding is also provided by prudential financial. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. no one got the chance to catch a post-election breath here in washington before all heck broke loose. filibuster threats, sex scandals, intraparty finger pointing, demands for w
in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together. to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years, from insurance to investment
stop? tonight on "washington week." >> four more years! four more years! four more years! gwen: the candidate's final pitch. who really owns hope and change? >> the question of this election comes down to this -- do you want more of the same or do you want real change and we want real change. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering ain't it. gwen: the polls can't predict it. the crowds can't guarantee it and even the early voters can't. >> it ended in the great recession of 2008. >> we know what this movie looks like at the end of the movie. turn on the tv and look at europe. >> a toss-up election, complete with its own october surprise. unpredictable, political embraces. >> if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and for the people of our state. gwen: then today, 171,000 new jobs adds to mostly good economic news. now, it's up to you. covering the week jackie comes of the "new york times." john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times" and amy
>> "inside washington" is brought you in part by the american federation of government employees, proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit afge.org. >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> we are going to die. we are going to freeze. >> this week on "inside washington," sandy's brutal october surprised. >> i want to thank the president personally. >> how many votes are these photographs worth? how do you compete with the natural disaster? climate change? neither candidate wants to go near its. the new unemployment number -- how will it play in the polling place? jeep jobs in china flap. >> sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. >> an outrageous lie. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we thought this is going to be a special preelection broadcast, that all we would have to do is handicapped the election. then along came hurricane sandy. in politics, a wi
>> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> i have no evidence at this point, from what i've seen, the classified information was disclosed. >> this week on "inside washington," a sex scandal at the top of the cia. the benghazi blame game. >> the american people deserve to know the facts. we cannot ever let this happen again. >> why would susan rice not get our vote? i don't trust her. >> defending susan rice. >> senator mccain and senator graham want to go after some big, they should go after me. >> there are no barriers, they to sitting down and working through this process. >> as the fiscal cliff limbs, is there a deal in the works? mitt romney explains why he lost . >> the president's campaign was focused on his base coalition, giving extraordinary gifts from the government, working aggressively to turn them out to vote. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> i just don't know where to begin this week. do we talk abo
to washington today after winning the electoral college, the popular vote and a second term. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, kwame holman wraps up the results and the reaction and ray suarez reports from chicago on the president's day. >> woodruff: we assess the tactics that led to success for the obama campaign and failure for mitt romney. >> ifill: we examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republica
to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >>
the federal deficit in half, instead he doubled it. >> rose: joining me from washington, d.c. is albert hunt of bloomberg news and john harris of politico. from des moines, iowa, john mile man. in new york, mark hall prin, cokie roberts and mat dowd of abc news and bloomberg news. i'm pleased they have them back on this program. we go to washington and albert hunt. where are we? >> charlie, i think that the fat lady is started to sing. it looks like thingsre moving in a very, very slow but steady direction in barack obama's favor both in the popular vote and the electoral vote. i base that on the polls, to be sure. also talking to both sides today i think's clearly more confidence in the obama camp. i think this is one of those great elections. there are very few of them, 2004 and 2000 were two where you aren't certain who is going to win but certainly all signs are pointing to a small obama victory tomorrow. >> rose: john harris? >> i agree with that if you look at these numbers and you look at the electoral college landscape and through any conventional prism what al said is completely tru
, a remarkable group of people have written and thought hard about the choices ahead. from washington d.c., tom friedman. he's a columnist for the "new york times" and coauthor of that used to be us, how america fell beyond the world we invented and how we can come back. david bureaucrats the author of social love and achievement. joining me is tom brokaw, special correspondent for nbc news and author of the times of our lives, a conversation about america. and jon meacham executive editor of random house and author of the fourth coming book, thomas jefferson the art of power. finally amy gutmann president of the university of pennsylvania and chair of the bioethics and quo author of the spirit of promise why campaigning under mines it. i am pleased to have each here for this information. what is it that this new president has to understand about america at this moment? >> well, i think that this new president is going to have to govern, and governing in a polarized society which we have and a society which has tremendous problem, budgetary economic, immigration, educational. the list goes on.
by powerful players in washington and on wall street. you can read how they did it in this book "winner-take-all politics" by two of the country's top political scientists, jacob hacker and paul pierson. they were drawn to a mystery every bit as puzzling as a crime drama "how washington made the rich richer and turned its back on the middle class." quote -- "we wanted to know how our economy stopped working to provide prosperity and security for the broad middle class." and that's what you saw. >> i think a lot of people know. the top one or two wrongs have shot up into the stratosphere while all of the other ones have stayed more or less in place. it's really astonishing how concentrated the games of economic growth have been. >> you know the startling statistic that we have in the book is that if you take all of the income gains from 1979 to 2007, so all the increased household income over that period around 40% of those gains went to the top 1%. and if you look at the bottom 90%, they had less than that combined. and it's not just a one or a two-year story. i mean, we've seen a terri
of people who have written and thought hard about the choices ahead. from washington, d.c., tom friedman, he is a columnist in for the times and cocoauthor of "that used to be us, how america fell behind in the world it e invented" and david brooks of the "new york times," he is the author of "the social animal." joining me in new york, tom brokaw, a special correspondent for nbc news and the author of "the time of our lives" a conversation about america. and jon meacham, the executive editor of random house and the author of the forthcoming book "thomas jefferson, the art of power." finally joining us, amy gutman, president of the university of pennsylvania and chair of the president's commission on bioethics and the coauthor of "the spirit of compromise" why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. i'm pleased to have each of them here for this conversation. we obviously don't know who the new president is and we come forward with the premise that whoever it is, these are the issues and the choices and the challenges that face him. i'll start with you. what is it this new presid
work. >> production assistants for "inside washington" provided by albritton communications and "politico." >> we have to pick ourselves up. we have fought our way back. and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nation, but then the networks called ohio and you knew it was over. the president won 93% of african-americans, a 71% of hispanics, more women than romn
from washington the mclaughlin group, the american original. for over three decades sources, hardest talk. >>> issue one. still chief. >>> thank you, thank you so much. tonight, more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward. tonight, in this election you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back, and we know, in our hearts, that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. whether you held an obama sign or a romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference. >>> the tally. president obama 50%. 58 millian votes. mitt romney, 48%. 56 million votes. so much for the popular vote. the electoral vote. 270 needed to win. president obama 303, governor romney 206. still unassigned, 29, florida is conducting a recount. >>> was this election a mandate, a landslide, a rout, a speaker, a marginal win, what was it? >> it is a significant victory by the preside
now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. the scam which brought down the c.i.a. director spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with
broadwell joined me for a conversation early this year. joining me from washington d.c., davidic nake a column else for "the washington post" and martha raddatz a senior affairs correspondent with abc news. two cbs colleagues, norah o'donnell my cohost and john miller correspondent at cbs news who is frequently with me on cbs this morning. i'm please to do have all of them here. we'll be joined by norah and john in just a moment. martha tell me about general petraeus. do you know him. what is it about this story that surprises you most? >> well, i have known general petraeus and covered him in war zones for about a decade and what surprised me most is he seems like a man who is so disciplined and so careful about his image and about his reputation that it was jaw dropping to me when i first heard it. >> rose: so the question is what didn't you understand about him? >> well, i mean i may not understand everything about him now but i was surprised that he would allow this i guess failure of discipline. he really does guard his reputation so well. he watch the people who are around him
corporations. what can we do for you? >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kay. armed with new job numbers and old attack lines, the two candidates for president begin their final pitches. the new york marathon cancelled amid suffering after sandy. residents of staten island say they've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now startshe weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been w
and washington may have refused to arm these rebels. but armed they are like never before. >> suarez: and margaret warner takes the story from there. >> warner: for more on today's developments and what they mean for syria's president bashar al assad, i'm joined by andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. he was in rebel-held syrian border regions in mid-november. andrew, welcome back. >> thank you. >> warner: first of all, how critical is the rebel seizure of some of these surface-to-air missile from the captured army bases? >> they're answer cloutly vital. for months the syrian army has harassed rebel held territories and they've bombed them into submission. with these shoulder-fired missiles they're able to down syrian aircraft of all types and it allows the syrian opposition to have the possibility of actually saying they have a pure liberated territory which is completely outside of the regime's control and that sets the stage for a possible benghazi-like pocket that could push president assad south and west war war so step back from all t
cliff. as darren gersh reports from washington, even before republicans and democrats sit down to talk on friday, both sides are laying down markers. >> reporter: just two days before he meets with congressional leaders, the president took a tougher tone on budget talks. in his news conference, he pushed hard for an immediate extension of tax cuts for everyone making less than $250,000 a year. >> and by the way, that means every american, including the wealthiest americans get a tax cut. it means that 98% of all americans, and 97% of all small businesses won't see their taxes go up a single dime. the senate has already passed a law like this. democrats in the house are ready to pass a law like this and i hope republicans in the house come on board too. >> reporter: republicans said again they would be willing to raise more tax revenue by closing loopholes or limiting deductions. but those revenues had to be matched with cuts in entitlement programs. >> until you make our entitlement programs fit the future demographic of country, the demographics of our country, you can't possibly solv
to get the job done. >> reporter: in washington, they think carefully about the pictures they want to present to the public so this mattered. all four congressional leaders-- democrats and republicans-- after meeting with the president chose to face the cameras together. that hardly ever happens and it reflects the new post-election mood of cooperation. house speaker john boehner called the meeting very constructive. >> i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. and i believe the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. >> reporter: to republican leaders balance means some higher tax revenues are paired with reductions in spending and changes in entitlement programs. that's a challenge for democrats, but the president seemed willing to move in that direction. >> our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises, build some consensus to do the peoples business. and wha
the cia director after admitting to an extramarital affair, sending shock waves through washington. and on the political front, it is back to business. can the parties to strike a deal to reverse the looming economic difficulties? a new teen-age magician in town is making quite a market in south africa. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it was a rather unexpected resignation. a short time ago, general david is stepping down as cia director. president obama accepted the resignation of the retired four- star general. he praised his outstanding service. michael, how much of a shock was this? >> it was pretty much a surprise, the general, as far as i know, was very well-thought of at the agency. certainly a defender of the agency and several weeks ago, he made it very clear after the attack that no one at the agency prevented assistance going to the man going under attack. it was the white house -- >> the resignation comes just ahead of hearing about been gauzy. >> it is a very peculiar thing, he was scheduled to testify under oath next thursd
and washington. i would like him and others around him look at it and look at things like jim crow and take stock of what his legacy will be. barack obama's first administration was a bit of confusion for many of us in the fight against the war on drugs. i spoke to 1/5 person who said i am not a drug czar. that comes from the wrong mindset. don't call it a drug war because we do not think that is a war against zero people. i thought, great, there is a new sheriff in town. the obama administration and whether it is because of them or because of washington, and i am probably inclined to think it is more the latter, they ended up being not very effective or changing the war on drugs other than changing the language. my fear with that, if you're going to conduct the war, do not conduct it on another name. i am troubled by the way the first term did not manifest serious and meaningful reform in this. but i am hopeful that a new term with the right pressure and with the right sense from this week's -- several victories in several states against the drug war that maybe washington and maybe the obama adm
you came from florida? >> i tell the story about 1963, after the march in washington, that freshman year, and demonstrations were happening and i became part of that. 17 years old, i am in jail, but because of something i believe in. i had been arrested. down the street from the capital, washington, d.c.. and then in 2010, having in exhibit. and the street from the capitol in washington, d.c. it was really something. it was amazing, it has truly been amazing. while we were there, actually, just before we opened, an artist in 2009, she had a bust of sojourners truth and failed by mrs. obama, and now it is at the capitol. -- it was unveiled by mrs. obama. to attend the ceremony and see rt by a blackl a woman was transforming. and that could that have happened if president obama was not an office. tavis: it has been in news and a lot lately, but in the news a lot lately, the hazing incident where the band leader was killed. the president of the university has resigned, but even what america has heard about this story. you were once on the board of trustees? tell me what is happening th
's measured in achievement. >> warner: in fairfax an independent voter rich suburb of washington d.c. >> so many of you look at the big debates in this country not as a republican or a democrat but as an independent thinker, as an american. and you watch what's happened to his country over the last four years with an independent voice you hope that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together. to solve big problems. he hasn't. i will. ( cheers and applause ) >> warner: in late afternoon he rallieded supporters in columbus, the capital of all important ohio. >> we feel good about the nature of the race. i think we're going to win ohio >> warner: do you see a path to victory without winning ohio >> there are numerous paths to victory to get to 270. but like anyone else, we'd rather get there with ohio than without it >> warner: ohio so crucial that romney's running mate paul ryan was there today to too. on the heels of stops in nevada, colorado, and iowa. romney's day won't end until midnight after an election eve rally in manchester, new hampshire. >> woodruff: late
to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington's struggle to avoid going off the "fiscal cliff" resumed in earnest today. the president moved to draw on his reelection victory for new clout with congress. the goal: a sweeping deficit agreement to avert $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases at the start of 2013. from the white house came word that president obama will try to build public pressure on congress to raise taxes on the wealthy and prevent tax hikes for everyone else. white house spokesman jay carney. >> well, the president believes very strongly that the american people matter in this debate. because this debate is about them. the question of whether or not taxes go up on 98% of american tax payers is a very important to ordinary americans. it is not just a matter for discussion between the president and the senate minority leader. or other congressional leaders. >> brown: to that end the president met privately today with small business owners. on friday he'll travel to the philadelphia area to speak further on the issue. not to be outdone
service at laguardia tomorrow.ag in washington, boston, newark, and new york's john f. kennedy, airport operations are returning to normal. flightaware estimates 2,800 flights were canceled today, down from a peak of almost 8,000 on monday. tomorrow, 530 flights have been officially scrapped, but that will grow, if as seems likely, laguardia has trouble opening tomorrow. add it up and airlines took a big hit from sandy. >> you can multiply 18,000 canceled flights by a few tens of thousands of dollars in revenue per flight and you're well north of $100 million in lost revenue. some of it they will be able to recover by flying flights more full over the next week, but a lot of it is gone. >> reporter: if it rolls on the ground, recovery will take longer. amtrak is providing limited service south and north of new york. but it gave no estimate for when flooded tunnels will be cleared and service restored into new york's penn station. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: the crippled transportation system is a big headache for fedex, joining us paul tronsor. he runs fed-ex' global
with washington. what the president and what washington in general can do is try to set the stage and set a groundwork for policy that could encourage growth. and i think the shorter term that you are thinking about, the less can be done specifically by the president. so if you are asking over a one month or three month period, there's very little the president can do. if you start asking over a five year, ten year period, then the policy decisions they make can influence quite a lot the way things go. >> brown: and john taylor, brief last word on that? >> well, i think as we are talking about four years what is going to happen the next four years. that say time where a president can make a tremendous difference. and we're talking about the past four years. and the president could have made a much better policy with the unemployment being so high. >> brown: all right, john taylor and austan goolsbee, thanks so much. >> thank you >> brown: and if you're ready for more analysis on the jobs numbers, you'll find it, as always, on paul solman's "making sense" page online. >> woodruff: still to
a massive selloff on wall street as investors worry about the status quo in washington. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the election is over but the fiscal cliff, is just eight weeks away, and it will play into every decision the president makes until january first. >> susie: and the fiscal cliff is a big worry for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. af
businesses are not only concerned about the fiscal showdown in washington, but also about corporate earnings. nearly all of the s&p 500 firms have reported numbers, and profit growth is the slowest since the recession in 2009. and the majority of firms are also reporting disappointing revenues. here's erika miller with a look back at the quarter, and a look ahead. >> reporter: earnings season is drawing to a close. and for many firms it's good riddance. nearly all of the s&p 500 have reported quarterly numbers, and according to s&p capital i.q., profits are up a measly 2%. thomson reuters and factset crunch the numbers slightly differently, and believe profits are actually down. the bigger concern is revenue growth. s&p has the most optimistic analysis with a 0.6% gain. the other two firms see negative growth. firms face an almost universal problem: a slowing global economy. >> companies kind of put it in this context: the red flag is europe still. china falling there after, being kind of a yellow flag. >> reporter: that weak global demand is forcing many companies to cut prices, hurting pro
encouraged that fiscal cliff negotiations in washington are making progress. that led to a powerful rally today, continuing the momentum from friday after that white house meeting between president obama, and congressional leaders. stocks rallied right from the opening bell: the dow surged 207 points, the nasdaq jumped nearly 63, and the s&p 500 rose 27. >> tom: those hopes about a fiscal cliff deal may be good enough for stock traders today, but is the economy in a position to deal with whatever solution politicians may hammer out? it's expected that the fiscal fix will involve tax hikes of some sort, and spending cuts as well. we spoke with economist dean baker from the center for economic and policy research, and economist douglas holtz- eakin of the american action forum. "n.b.r.'s" washington bureau chief darren gersh began the discussion by asking baker what tighter federal policy will mean for the economy in the coming year. >> insofar as we get austerity, we get tax increases, spending cuts, that's going to slow the economy. i anticipate a deal so we are don't see the full, you kn
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 148 (some duplicates have been removed)

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